Seminar – invisible disabilities in the workplace

We have been asked to promote this free seminar – if you have an interest in disability within the legal profession, then this will be a timely and relevant event to attend.

The invisible impairments in the workplace event has been designed to support solicitors, HR and D&I practitioners. This event looks at the varying experiences of members of the profession who live with invisible/hidden impairments. We will also be discussing conditions such as cancer that have been acquired during a solicitors working career and the ways in which employers can be better equipped to support an employee with an invisible impairment.

Learning objectives

  • Top tips on how to discuss your disability in the workplace
  • Learn how to support an employee with a hidden disability
  • Gain first hand insight of the experiences of solicitors with hidden disabilities.

Programme

17:00 – 17:30 Registration and refreshments

17:30 – 17:40  Welcome and introductions

17:40 – 18:50  Panel session Vanessa Forster, British Council legal team and LDD committee member Robert Hunter, partner, Edmonds Marshall McMahon and LDD committee member
Caroline Milton, Macmillan at work delivery manager, Macmillan Cancer Support

18:50 – 19:05  Comfort Break

19:05 – 19:45  Q&A session 19:45 – 20:30  Networking drinks

Who should attend?

This event is open to all solicitors, D&I and HR professionals.

Price

This event is free to attend. Book your place here.

 

City Disabilities

A screenshot of the City Disabilities website homepage

Networks in focus – City Disabilities

In a career that spans over 30 years in the City, Robert Hunter has been a partner in both a magic circle law firm, and a boutique fraud specialist firm. He has conducted advocacy in fraud and trust cases at all stages in the proceedings, including carrying out cross examination at trial. Robert is profoundly deaf, having suffered from progressive hearing loss since his early teens.

Together with Kayleigh Farmer and Kate Rees-Doherty, Robert founded City Disabilities, a charity offering mentoring and advice to students and professionals who are disabled or have long-term health conditions. City Disabilities also works with employers and professional bodies to raise awareness and improve best practice, including organising training, speakers and events.

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Focus Group Dates

These groups are crucial to help us to gain a better insight into the issues that you have faced throughout your career so that we can start to shape our research questions.

We will provide a number of prompts to stimulate discussion to explore the experiences of disabled people and people with health conditions (including mental health) across the legal profession.

  • Focus Groups will be run in co-operation with the LDD
  • Each session 1.5 hours maximum
  • Groups of two to ten people
  • Chatham House Rules – confidentiality respected
  • Held in accessible venues around England and Wales
  • All focus groups facilitated by disabled people

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Who can participate?

Who are we including?

We are exploring the experiences of disabled people and people with impairments or health conditions (including mental health) working in the legal profession. We seek to make the research as representative as possible. You may or may not consider yourself to be disabled but take a look at our page explaining different definitions of disability and see whether the research could apply to you.

The lists below are not exhaustive, if in doubt about whether your experiences or career fits our research, please get in touch!

This research includes:

  • Solicitors
  • Barristers
  • Legal executives
  • Clerks
  • Those who are qualified but unemployed
  • Lawyers who were once employed in the legal profession but have since left (and during the time employed, were disabled)

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The next steps

What happens next?

There are a number of key stages to the development of the research, all of which will happen in equal partnership (co-production) with disabled legal professionals.

The project has established a Research Reference Group consisting of only disabled legal professionals and the two key researchers.  This group supports the researchers with designing and delivering the research. Data has been collected through a number of focus groups and we will shortly begin one to one interviews.  When analysis of the interviews is complete we will distribute a large-scale survey.  At all stages, the aim is for disabled people to lead the way.

Continue reading “The next steps”

Legally Disabled is launched!

Legally Disabled?

September 2017 marked the launch of an exciting new research project, “Legally Disabled? The career experiences of disabled people in the legal profession in England & Wales: developing future strategies.”

 

An executive meeting of the Lawyers with Disabilities Division (c) Natasha Hirst

Prof Debbie Foster and Dr Natasha Hirst formally launched the “Legally Disabled” research project at the September executive meeting of the Lawyers with Disabilities Division (LDD) at the Law Society in London.

 

The project has been given huge support and the great enthusiasm of project partners at the LDD has helped the project get off to the best possible start.

The research is funded by the DRILL Programme (Disability Research into Independent Living and Learning), a four nations project providing grants across the UK for research designed and delivered in co-production between disabled people and academics or researchers.

With Cardiff University as the lead on this 18-month project, all researchers on the project are disabled people and the key project partner, the LDD, consists of disabled lawyers. The research will be investigating the barriers and solutions for disabled people across the legal profession.

The Lawyers with Disabilities Division (Law Society) have been key partners in the development of the project which aims to co-produce research with disabled legal professionals. We are continuing to seek the involvement of other groups across the legal profession.

For further information on disability research undertaken at Cardiff University, take a look at the Disability and Employment blog.